You can help end slavery in Mauritania

What’s happening?

Slavery in Mauritania is considered to be deeply rooted in the structure of its society and closely tied to the ethnic composition of the country. It was only in 1981 that slavery was abolished in Mauritania – being the last country to abolish this practice. However, no criminal laws were passed to enforce the ban. Later, in 2007, the government passed a law allowing slaveholders to be prosecuted, but this didn’t curb the problem. Since 2007, only one slave master has been prosecuted, and anyone that challenges the law is detained and tortured. Now, in 2015, 10 – 20% of the population of Mauritania are slaves – the highest proportion on earth.

Avaaz’s efforts

Haby mint Rabah was forced into slavery at the age of five. She spent her days herding animals and her nights being raped by her ‘master’. She thought this life was normal. One day, her brother escaped his masters and found an organisation working to stop slavery and asked them to help free Haby.

“…when they came to take me away, at first I completely refused. I couldn’t imagine a life away from my masters, a life where you worked no matter what, even if pregnant or giving birth. This was the only life I had ever known.” – Haby mint Rabah via Avaaz

The man who freed Haby is called Biram Dah Abeid. He is now behind bars for daring to speak out against slavery. Avaaz is working to releasing Biram and calling for the President of Mauritania to make real progress to end slavery in their country.

“We call on you to do everything in your power to ensure anti-slavery leader Biram Dah Abeid and his colleagues are freed immediately and unconditionally, repression of abolitionists stops, legal recognition is given to anti-slavery organisations, and real progress is made to end this human cruelty in Mauritania.” – Avaaz

Supporting Avaaz

Phoenix Rising For Children (PRFC) is an accredited out-of-home or foster care agency providing services in Sydney, including the greater metropolitan areas, Central Coast and parts of the Hunter region of NSW, Australia. PRFC was founded in 2001 to provide quality foster care to children and young people in NSW, including contemporary, quality, family-based foster care and effective and specialist support services to children and young people and their families. PRFC operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

Have you considered fostering a young one? PRFC undertakes regular planning and evaluation and has a focus on personal development and training. We are always interested in hearing from those passionate about making a meaningful difference for a child in foster care or a family requiring assistance. If you would like to become a foster carer and join our team providing effective and meaningful care to children and young people, please contact us!

We also provide family contact services, and these specialize in contact supervision for children in out of home care with their parents and other significant family members.

We can be reached at mail@phoenixrising.org.au

Learn more about our foster care agency in NSW at www.phoenixrising.org.au

How you can help

Join with Avaaz and help save Biram and abolish slavery in Mauritania.

“If we build a petition calling for Biram’s release and shaming the country’s slavery apologists — and pressure Mauritania’s western allies to do the same, leading a high-level advocacy trip with media and government representatives, we can win this brave man’s freedom and strike a critical blow against one of the last bastions of slavery in the world. Sign now!” – Avaaz

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/mauritania_anti_slavery_biram_loc_dn/?slideshow

 

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