Take the pledge and be fur-free this winter

The facts about fur

Each year, over50 million animals suffer and die as victims of the international fur trade. Here in Australia, there is a dark side to winter: the truth about the cruelty sheep, rabbits, geese and ducks can be subjected to in the production of the products we wear during winter – angora scarves and woollen mittens, feather quilts and down coats.

Down, angora and wool

Down is the layer of soft and tiny feathers closest to a bird’s body. For ducks, geese and other birds, it does the job that nature intended – keeping them warm during the long, freezing winter months. But it has also been touted as one the lightest and warmest ‘fillers’ possible for a quilt or coat – for people. Down is most often ‘harvested’ through a process called ‘live-plucking’, which is as disturbing as it sounds.

Angora rabbits have been bred to have very long and soft fur, which is harvested and turned into ‘luxury’ clothing and accessories like gloves and hats. Rabbits are tied down on racks as their fur is torn from their bodies by hand. Other rabbits are shorn with scissors or razors, and injuries are frequently reported. The rabbits are then crammed into small wire cages, where they’ll be kept for two months, before the whole gruelling process starts again.

An ever-present risk to the welfare of wool-producing sheep in Australia is the prevalence of farms without adequate shade or shelter. As many as 15 million lambs also die from exposure every year – most within their first 48 hours of life – due to a lack of food and shelter in barren and freezing paddocks, or due to predation.

Animals Australia

How to be cruelty-free

You can be cruelty-free by shopping for synthetic and plant-based alternatives to wool, down and angora – cotton, bamboo, modal, microfibre, Tencel (made from eucalyptus) ingeo (made from corn fibres), Primaloft and Microcloud.

A growing number of retailers and designers are rejecting animal cruelty by adopting fur-free policies. Check out Animal Australia’s Fur Free Shopping List to make sure you can shop without worrying.

Supporting Animals Australia

Phoenix Rising For Children (PRFC) is an accredited out-of-home or foster care provider based in the Sydney greater metropolitan area and Hunter Central Coast of N.S.W, Australia. PRFC was founded in 2001 to provide quality foster care to children and young people in N.S.W, including contemporary, quality, family-based foster care and effective and specialist support services to children and young people and their families. PRFC operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

Have you considered fostering a young one? PRFC undertakes regular planning and evaluation and has a focus on personal development and training. If you would like to become a foster carer and join our team providing effective and meaningful care to children and young people, please contact us!

We also provide family contact services, and these specialize in contact supervision for children in out of home care with their parents and other significant family members.

We can be reached at mail@phoenixrising.org.au

Learn more about our foster care agency in NSW at www.phoenixrising.org.au

Take the pledge!

You can spare thousands of animals from suffering every year by pledging to never wear their fur.

Join with Animals Australia and take the pledge to be cruelty-free:

http://www.animalsaustralia.org/take_action/pledge/fur/

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