Help stop hunger in Timor-Leste!

The situation in Timor-Leste

 

Timor-Leste is resource-rich but remains poorly developed. It ranks 120th out of 169 countries in the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) 2010 Human Development Index. The World Bank’s 2008 Timor-Leste poverty survey showed that the population living below the national official poverty line of US$0.88 per capita per day grew from 36 percent in 2001 to 50 percent in 2007, with increases in both rural and urban areas.

Under-nutrition remains a major public health problem. Poor maternal and child health and nutrition results from many factors, including food taboos and dietary practices that lead to low consumption of nutritious food; unavailability of fortified nutritious foods; inadequate knowledge of good child feeding practices such as timely initiation of breastfeeding and appropriate complementary foods; high incidence of acute respiratory infection and diarrhoea; poor access to and uptake of health services; inadequate sanitation and hygiene practices; geographical isolation; and lack of adequate infrastructure.

 

The children of Timor-Leste

Timor-Leste has a higher incidence of underweight children than either Ethiopia or Malawi.
Children are particularly vulnerable during the hungry season, where 47% under the age of five suffer from chronic malnutrition. Malnutrition weakens the immune system and can lead to a heightened risk of illness and disease. Research has shown that the effects of chronic malnutrition are irreversible if it left untreated by the time a child reaches two or three years of age.

Adriana de Andrade’s son, Juandro, is a survivor. When he was only eight months old he had difficulty breathing and became very sick from malnutrition.

Adriana now takes Juandro to Oxfam supplementary feeding classes in their village Lontale, where she learns how to:

  • Cook nutritious meals
  • Process fresh food so it lasts longer
  • Access ingredients that are high in protein

Much of the program is about re-educating the community through cooking demonstrations and showing parents how to add vegetables, meat and eggs to traditional rice porridge so children get more essential nutrients in their diets.

 

Supporting Oxfam

 

Phoenix Rising For Children (PRFC) is an accredited out-of-home or foster care provider based in Sydney, N.S.W, Australia. PRFC was founded in 2001 to provide quality foster care to children and young people across Sydney, including contemporary, quality, family-based foster care and effective and specialist support services to children and young people and their families. PRFC operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support such organisations as Oxfam as they encompass similar ideals.

Have you considered fostering a young one? PRFC undertakes regular planning and evaluation and has a focus on personal development and training. If you would like to become a foster carer and join our team providing effective and meaningful care to children and young people, please contact us!

We also provide family contact services, and these specialize in contact supervision for children in out of home care with their parents and other significant family members.

We can be reached at mail@phoenixrising.org.au

 

Learn more about our foster care agency in NSW at www.phoenixrising.org.au

What can we do?

You can support families to give children like Juandro better health. Donate now so we can address poor nutrition and Stop Hunger.

Together we can stop the hungry season for good. Please give generously today.

 

https://www.oxfam.org.au/my/donate/stop-the-hungry-season/

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