Archive | August 2013

Testing products on animals is an unnecessary cruelty

Animal testing in Australia

In Australia, up to 6.5 million animals annually are used in futile and cruel experiments. Most animals are killed during or after experiments. The public is generally denied access to the facts around animal experiments in any real detail.

The vast majority of animals used in research are subjected to some degree of pain or stress during  experimental procedures to which they may be subjected, or as a result of the environment in which they are kept prior to or after those procedures.

Animals are not only used in medical research – they are also used to test products such as shampoos, cleaners, and makeup.

It is illegal in Australia to test cosmetics on animals. However, the problem lies in that many popular products in supermarkets have been tested on animals, and this is because there is no law to prevent Australian and international companies from carrying out cruel animal tests overseas before selling their products here.

 L’oreal

L’oreal has recently bought into China’s $35.6 billion beauty market, but there is a hidden cost if you are a rabbit or a mouse. China’s government requires animal testing for every new beauty product it sells.

China is the only major market where companies must test their mascaras and lotions on animals. Rabbits are killed or ingredients dripped into their eyes during tests, London animal rights group Cruelty Free International says.

China’s policies create a problem for companies such as L’Oreal and Procter & Gamble that want to sell in the country without alienating consumers in markets that demand humane treatment of animals.

http://www.smh.com.au/world/loreal-buys-back-into-tests-on-animals-20130823-2sgzu.html

Testing on animals is unnecessary

 Companies like L’oreal, Procter & Gamble, Unilever, and Colgate/Palmolive manage to evade Asutralian regulations by doing their testing overseas. These tests are harmful to animals and are entirely unnessecary. Toxicity tests blind, burn, poison and kill millions of rabbits, dogs and other animals every year.

The majority of ingredients commonly used in household cleaners or cosmetics have been safety tested years ago, and the differences in animal physiology means that even brand new ingredients can’t be accurately tested for human safety on anything other than humans.

 

 Alternatives

 Many alternatives to the use of animals have been developed, particularly in toxicity testing and teaching. Studies of systems in cell culture provide many opportunities of substitution for animal experiments.

There are plenty of companies using readily-available alternatives to animal testing which show that there are no more excuses to torture animals. Supporting these companies is one way to show companies like L’oreal that you don’t approve of their animal experimentation.

What can we do?

 Animals Australia is running a campaign to ban the sale of animal-tested cosmetics in Australia.

In 2009, the European Union introduced legislation to phase out the testing of cosmetics on animals throughout Europe. This law also prohibits the sale of cosmetics that have been tested on animals, no matter where they are produced.

 We can help bring about this law in Australia by joining forces with Animals Australia.

 

 Supporting Animals Australia

 Phoenix Rising For Children (PRFC) is an accredited out-of-home or foster care provider based in Sydney, N.S.W, Australia. PRFC was founded in 2001 to provide quality foster care to children and young people across Sydney, including contemporary, quality, family-based foster care and effective and specialist support services to children and young people and their families. PRFC operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support such organisations as Animals Australia as they encompass similar ideals.

Have you considered fostering a young one? PRFC undertakes regular planning and evaluation and has a focus on personal development and training. If you would like to become a foster carer and join our team providing effective and meaningful care to children and young people, please contact us!

We can be reached at mail@phoenixrising.org.au

Learn more about our foster care agency in NSW at www.phoenixrising.org.au

Take Action

You can make the difference, take action now to ban animal tested products.

http://www.animalsaustralia.org/take_action/ban-animal-tested-products/

Help end cruel animal testing

http://www.animalsaustralia.org/take_action/stop-animal-tests/

Read more about animal experimentation and the alternatives:

http://www.animalsaustralia.org/factsheets/animal_experimentation.php

Greenpeace envisions an energy revolution

 

Greenpeace are working towards bringing about an energy revolution in Australia.

“Greenpeace has a vision of a world where everyone can use clean, safe, affordable, pollution-free energy. The Energy [R]evolution is a blueprint your bank could invest in to make this vision a reality in Australia.” – www.greenpeace.org

 

What’s the current situation?

At the moment, Australia is the world’s highest per capita polluter, because of our heavy use of coal. Burning coal for electricity is the largest cause of greenhouse gas pollution in Australia and the world.

However, there is a way to stop the pollution, and the solution is renewable energy. Australia also has the natural assets and technical know-how to lead the world in renewable energy.

 

Alternatives to coal

There are now a range of proven and commercial technologies that offer solutions and alternatives to coal, and by turning to renewable energy we will also be stimulating new investments and creating millions more jobs than fossil fuels ever could. Greenpeace shows us how in this article: “Solutions: Green Jobs and Economy.”

These alternatives include wind power, solar power, geothermal power and cogeneration power, and Australia has the potential to incorporate all four alternatives into realities.

 

The potential for alternative solutions to coal

Wind power – Australia has outstanding wind resources, especially in our southern states, where a number of wind projects have already been built.

Solar power – Australia has some of the best solar resources in the world – a 50km by 50km square in the outback would receive enough solar energy to power the entire country.

Geothermal power – It’s been said that harnessing just 1 per cent of our geothermal resources would be enough to power Australia’s electricity needs more than 26,000 times over.

Cogeneration power – Examples exist already of businesses reducing the electricity bills and emissions, as well as actually supplying net energy to the grid, and by 2020 its use could replace 7000 Megawatts of coal-fired power plant, the equivalent of replacing the largest plants in Queensland, NSW and Victoria combined.

 

Supporting Greenpeace

 Phoenix Rising For Children (PRFC) is an accredited out-of-home or foster care provider based in Sydney, N.S.W, Australia. PRFC was founded in 2001 to provide quality foster care to children and young people across Sydney, including contemporary, quality, family-based foster care and effective and specialist support services to children and young people and their families. PRFC operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support such organisations as Greenpeace as they encompass similar ideals.

Have you considered fostering a young one? PRFC undertakes regular planning and evaluation and has a focus on personal development and training. If you would like to become a foster carer and join our team providing effective and meaningful care to children and young people, please contact us!

We can be reached at mail@phoenixrising.org.au

Learn more about our foster care agency in NSW at www.phoenixrising.org.au

 

What’s being done about this?

Thousands of Australians are working to make the renewable energy revolution a reality, educating people about the benefits of zero-carbon technology and campaigning to bring renewables to their area. Beyond Zero Emissions and the 100% Renewable campaign are two great examples of nationwide efforts to promote renewable energy in Australia.

 

How can we help?

Greenpeace needs all the help they can get!

You can become part of Greenpeace’s campaign to replace polluting power with renewable energy by taking action now! You can even volunteer.

Support this campaign and let’s help bring about the end of needless pollution.

http://www.greenpeace.org/australia/en/what-you-can-do/take-action-online/

http://www.greenpeace.org/australia/en/what-you-can-do/volunteer/

Tweet the Energy Revolution!

http://www.greenpeace.org/australia/en/what-we-do/climate/Report-2010/Tweet-the-Energy-Revolution/

 

 

The Great Barrier Reef campaign is working!

The Great Barrier Reef

Clouds of reef fish and corals, French frigate shoals, NWHI

The Great Barrier Reef is on the Coral Sea, off the coast of Queensland, and is the world’s largest coral reef system. It stretches for over 2,600 kilometres, can be seen from outer space, and is the world’s biggest single structure made by living organisms called coral polyps. CNN labelled it one of the seven natural wonders of the world, and it is the state icon of Queensland.

Why is it in danger?

One of the largest liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals is being built in Gladstone Harbor and this is causing massive amounts of damage to the Great Barrier Reef, so much so that Australia has been given six months to fix the problem, or else the Great Barrier Reef will be down-listed to ‘World Heritage in danger.’

At Gladstone at the moment, approximately 42 million tonnes of the Harbour bed is being dredged to build pipelines to the terminals and infrastructure and port development for shipping vessels which will take the LNG overseas. This dredging has resulted in a high degree of contaminant mobilisation, poisoning fish, dugongs, turtles and other marine life.

What will happen to the reef?

Climate scientists argue that these coal developments will double Australia’s carbon emissions in the next decade. This will make conditions impossible for the reef’s survival, and will lead to environmental catastrophe.

The coal development companies are now waiting on Federal Environmental Minister Tony Burke’s final decision on whether they will be allowed to begin the Abbot Point dredging project, which will allow them to dump their spoil off the coast of Bowen.

What is being done?

Avaaz has been actively campaigning for years to save the Great Barrier Reef. The campaign to save the Great Barrier Reef has achieved some small successes.

The Avaaz community has been fighting to save the unparalleled beauty of the reef for years. Last year, Avaaz members threatened a public US Bank when they were set to invest in Reef destruction. Hundreds of thousands of Avaaz members sent messages to the Australian Environment Minister to help win the largest marine reserve in the world.

What’s happening now?

The Great Barrier Reef is at risk of being dredged to make way for a mega coal project. But if one key investor walks away, the deal would be sunk and the World Heritage Site would be protected. We can convince them to pull out, or get PM Rudd to stop the plan, but we have to act now.

Avaaz has already seen one small victory o\for the Great Barrier Reef – The Minister just delayed the dredging decision and announced a public consultation.

So now is our chance to really make the difference! If we all band together we can convince investors to pull out of the deal, and we can save the future of our Great Barrier Reef.

Supporting Avaaz

 AVAAZ_ORG-02

Phoenix Rising For Children (PRFC) is an accredited out-of-home or foster care provider based in Sydney, N.S.W, Australia. PRFC was founded in 2001 to provide quality foster care to children and young people across Sydney, including contemporary, quality, family-based foster care and effective and specialist support services to children and young people and their families. PRFC operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support such organisations as Avaaz as they encompass similar ideals.

Have you considered fostering a young one? PRFC undertakes regular planning and evaluation and has a focus on personal development and training. If you would like to become a foster carer and join our team providing effective and meaningful care to children and young people, please contact us! 

We can be reached at mail@phoenixrising.org.au

Learn more about our foster care agency at www.phoenixrising.org.au

What can we do to help Avaaz with their Great Barrier Reef campaign?

The investor group Aurizon has been backing the project to dredge up soil near the Great barrier Reef know that this project has terrible consequences for the Reef. They’re getting cold feet, and we might be able to push them over the edge, and get them to back out of the project entirely. One of the main potential funders has even donated to climate activism!

“If one million of us express our head-shaking disbelief at this crazy project in the next few days, we can help get Aurizon to pull funding and maybe even persuade the Australian PM to step in. This is what Avaaz is for, let’s raise a voice for common sense!” – Avaaz.org

Let’s support Avaaz in their campaign to save the Great Barrier Reef – now is the time for action!

 Sign the petition:

 https://secure.avaaz.org/en/australian_coal_disaster_global/

 Read more about what’s happening to the Reef and how Greenpeace are trying to save it here:

http://www.greenpeace.org/australia/en/news/climate/Murky-waters/

 You can also help by sharing the story with everyone you know.

Every additional signature counts, it is up to us to fight for the Reef.

Flooding in Nicaragua and India – thousands of animals need our help!

Flooding in Nicaragua

Early in July, Nicaragua experienced some heavy rainfall that has caused flooding in areas of Nicaragua. One of the worst affected regions was the Municipality Prinzapolka, in the Northern Autonomous Atlantic Region. Damage to crops, livestock and infrastructure has been reported. Damage assessments made by the mayor of Prinzapolka confirm that about 9,768 people were affected by floods.

The heavy rainfall in Nicaragua is said to have been caused by tropical waves. Tropical waves are considered by the Nicaraguan Institute of Territorial Studies (INET) as one of the main phenomena that cause rainfall in the country.

flood1

The WSPA response

The WSPA (World Society for the Protection of Animals) has committed to responding swiftly to send out a team to Prinzapolka to treat over 11,000 animals in 15 communities affected by the heavy flooding caused by a series of tropical storms. The WSPA disaster relief team will be working in the rural communities along the Prinzapolka River and providing emergency treatment to the animals. These animals have no access to veterinary care and are at risk of infections, parasites, digestive problems, and diseases. These rural communities in Nicaragua are vulnerable and depend on these animals for survival.

 

Supporting WSPA

Phoenix Rising For Children (PRFC) is an accredited out-of-home or foster care provider based in Sydney, N.S.W, Australia. PRFC was founded in 2001 to provide quality foster care to children and young people across Sydney, including contemporary, quality, family-based foster care and effective and specialist support services to children and young people and their families. PRFC operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support such organisations as the WSPA as they encompass similar ideals.

Have you considered fostering a young one? PRFC undertakes regular planning and evaluation and has a focus on personal development and training. If you would like to become a foster carer and join our team providing effective and meaningful care to children and young people, please contact us!

We can be reached at mail@phoenixrising.org.au

Learn more about our foster care agency at www.phoenixrising.org.au

 

WSPA in India

WSPA has also been working in communities in India, when in June this year, severe flooding and landslides hit Northern India. The flooding in India has been the worst natural disaster they have seen since the 2004 tsunami. WSPA are working with the Pithoragarh District Veterinary Office and the Association for People Advancement and Action Research, who have helped WSPA respond to two of the worst hit areas of Northern India – Dharchula and Musyari Block. They hope that with the help given, they can directly improve the welfare of more than 92,000 animals and up to 10,000 households.

 

How can we help?

WSPA are appealing for any donations to support their cause in Nicaragua. The treatment of injured animals in Nicaragua involves veterinary treatment, provision of basic veterinary kits, and disaster preparedness training, all of which costs $28,800, so our support is more urgent than ever.

Our donations will also help the animals in India, and any animals in future disasters, by allowing WSPA to act quickly to bring immediate relief to animals in need.

Act now and help provide vital relief to the flood-stricken animals in Nicaragua.

‘Stop Trashing Australia’ Greenpeace campaign

Plastic pollution is a major issue across our country today. Australians use between 13 – 14 billion drinks containers each year, and unfortunately the recycling schemes aren’t in place to re-manufacture or re-use the plastic bottles. Recycling does take place, but only for less than half of the containers we use, and only South Australia has a scheme in place for container collection. The rest ends up filling space in landfills, littering the streets, parks, and oceans.

What’s the problem?

These plastic containers become hazardous to many marine animals and birds. Not just in Australia, but all the world has been affected by marine plastic pollution. Up to a third of the plastic comes from the beverage industry. For the birds and animals, the plastic is known to be the cause of their injuries and deaths when they mistake it for prey and eat it. This includes whales, dolphin, turtles, seals, and many others.

According to Dr Jennifer Lavers, whose research focuses on the impacts of plastics on marine life, up to 85% of Australian marine birds are affected by plastics.

Image

Is there a solution?

There is a solution to the problems caused by plastic pollution, and it is as simple as a container deposit scheme (CDS) – also known as ‘cash for containers’.

With a container deposit scheme in action, there is an incentive for returning those containers for recycling. It’s just as easy as purchasing the drink, you pay a 10 cent deposit which is included in your purchase price, and then you return your container to a designated recycling agent to receive your cash back.

“Beverage container recycling rates are appallingly low in most states. 40% of the rubbish we collect on Clean Up Australia Day is bottles and cans, but in South Australia, where they have container deposits, they are just 8.4% of the rubbish we collect” – Ian Kiernan AO Founder of Clean Up Australia and past Australian of the year.

South Australia has had this program in place for over 30 years and today, 81% of their bottles are recycled, around twice the rate of other states.

According to CleanUp Australia, the community service sector will earn around $70 million a year to re-invest into local communities if we adopt this approach nationally. A Newspoll survey from 2012 showed cash for containers is supported by over 80% of the Australian public.

 

So why isn’t the scheme in place?

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The major soft drink companies like Coca Cola, Lion and Schweppes don’t want the deposit scheme put in place and spend considerable resources lobbying and on advertising campaigns fighting the imposition of these schemes. Coca Cola has even gone so far as to take the North Territory Government to court in order to shut the NT scheme down. The Northern Territory launched their scheme in January 2012 and was reporting that millions of containers were being diverted from landfills and the environment, however earlier this year Coca Cola successfully launched a legal challenge against the scheme, with the reasoning that they didn’t want Northern Territory households to have to pay up to 20 cents extra for their drinks.

It is unclear what is the real reason they would be opposed, given all the benefits of the scheme, but it is possible that it is due to a perception within Coke (and there are anecdotes confirming this) that any interference with its operations, packaging, etc, is an unnecessary government intervention, or perhaps these beverage companies want to avoid the complexities of having to adjust to a new system, believing they have other commercial priorities, preferring the simplicity of current arrangements where councils take the responsibility.

Coca Cola have gone so far as to create myths about the increased costs for the consumer, and other misinformation about CDS, to try and scare consumers away from the idea. In fact, according to CleanUp Australia, a national recycling refund program would cut current local government waste and recycling costs by $32 million.

You can read more on the myths created by Coca Cola and the truth about them on the Greenpeace site: http://www.greenpeace.org/australia/en/news/oceans/The-benefits-and-well-benefits-Your-12-step-guide-to-effective-recycling-in-Australia/

 

What can we do to help?

This year, state governments are coming together to discuss implementing a recycling refund scheme nationwide. We can help out by telling Coca Cola and the beverage industry to stop trashing Australia and let our leaders know how much we want a scheme to keep our streets and beaches clean and to protect our oceans and animals.

TAKE ACTION: Email Premier Barry O’Farrell asking him to back a national ‘Cash for Containers’ scheme

READ: The benefits and, well, benefits! Your 11-step guide to effective recycling in Australia

WATCH: The Greenpeace Coca-Cola ad that got banned from national TV

SHARE: the benefits of Cash for Containers’ infographic

Avaaz.org – The World in Action

A significant movement is taking place in the world today. That movement is Avaaz.org – an organization that really makes a difference where it is most needed.

What is Avaaz.org?

The name Avaaz was derived for the Persian word for “voice”. Avaaz.org was launched in 2007 as a global civic organisation that promotes activism on issues such as climate change, human rights, animal rights, corruption, poverty and conflict. These are the issues that most need addressing in some of the more disadvantaged countries around the world, and Avaaz works to “close the gap between the world we have and the world most people everywhere want”.

Avaaz.org is “the world’s largest and most effective online campaigning community for change” with over 25 million members in 194 countries, and operating in 15 languages.

How did Avaaz begin?

Avaaz was co-founded by a number of organisations and individuals, including Res Publica and MoveOn.org. Res Publica is a “community of public sector professionals dedicated to promoting good governance, civic virtue and deliberative democracy”, and MoveOn.org is a non-profit progressive public policy advocacy group. They are also supported by GetUp!, an Australian non-profit campaigning organization.

“Avaaz is only five years old, but has exploded to become the globe’s largest and most powerful online activist network.” – The Guardian article on Avaaz.org

 So what do they do?

Avaaz.org has a simple mission, and as their director himself Ricken Patel said in 2011 – “We have no ideology per se. Our mission is to close the gap between the world we have and the world most people everywhere want. Idealists of the world unite!”

The technology that exists today has made it possible, easier, and quicker to call attention to new issues by creating campaigns.

“Avaaz has a single, global team with a mandate to work on any issue of public concern – allowing campaigns of extraordinary nimbleness, flexibility, focus, and scale.” – Avaaz.org

Each year, Avaaz prioritises the campaigns they focus on by polling their members on the campaign ideas. The campaigns that have the strongest response are the ones that Avaaz then focuses on.

Their work is entirely member-funded. Avaaz don’t accept donations or funding from governments or corporations and so, “No corporate sponsor or government backer can insist that Avaaz shifted its priorities to suit some external agenda” – Avaaz.org

 What is their impact?

Since 2007 Avaaz has launched hundreds of global and national campaigns. Their rapidly-increasing international community of members has worked to fight corruption in India, Italy and Brazil, protect the world’s oceans, rainforests and endangered wildlife, defend internet and media freedoms, amongst many other important human rights issues.

One of their most recent success stories was earlier in June, 2013, when Avaaz launched a campaign to stop an Icelandic tycoon from shipping the carcasses of endangered fin whales into Japan. Over 1.1 million Avaaz campaigners, along with Greenpeace, created the pressure that got the whale meat put back on a ship to Iceland.

“The Avaaz campaign has played an important role in stopping the whalers from profiting — bringing us closer to ending the hunt for these magnificent and endangered whales” – John Frizell, director of Greenpeace International.

 

How do we join in?

 Image

As an independent, not-for-profit global campaigning organization, Avaaz relies on its members for donations and funding to support the campaigns that truly make a difference across the world. Avaaz have proved that what they do works. They’ve influenced the outcomes of global climate summits, held rallies across the world on Tibet, campaigned to end the Iraq war, and donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to support the pro-democracy movement in Burma.

You can help support Avaaz by making a contribution to their organisation, as either a one-off donation or even a monthly contribution that will help support their work all year.

Donate now and let’s help Avaaz.org keep up the great work!

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/donate/

Unnecessary invasive surgery conducted on conscious greyhounds.

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A recently published study conducted by researchers at the University of Newcastle have used greyhounds and subjected them to invasive surgery without general anaesthetic or any other forms of sedation. The study is titled ‘Integration of baroreflex and autoregulation control of bronchial blood flow in awake dogs’ and was published in 2011.

The experiment was apparently an attempt to explore the body’s stabilising mechanism for maintainging blood pressure in relation to bronchial circulation in the lungs, however the researchers make no specific comment on the relevance of this research to humans.

The experiment was supported by a Project Grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC), however there are a few other experiments that have been conducted that were similar to this one, thus making the necessity of this one very questionable.

What happens in the surgery

In this study, the researchers used 12 greyhound dogs. They were first surgically implanted with a medical device for measuring blood flow on their right bronchial artery. This was done under general anaesthesia, where incisions were made in their skin to apply the device and catheters.

After this initial experiment the dogs were given antibiotics and a ten day recovery and training period, however there has been no mention of any pain relief being given to the dogs at this point.

After this ten day post-op period, the dogs underwent a second procedure, and this time the experiment involved the deliberate decision to abstain from administering any form of general anaesthetic or sedative. This means that the dogs were fully awake and aware of the surgery being conducted on them. They were only given a local anaesthetic, and in six of the dogs this process was conducted after giving them chemicals to induce dilation of blood vessels to slow the heart rate and lower blood pressure.

In one dog, a catheter was passed through the jugular vein in the neck into the heart, and again the induced change in blood pressure was measured after being raised and lowered through the process of inflation and deflation of an aortic balloon catheter. This invasive part of the study was again conducted using only under local anaesthesia.

The authors of the study state that the absence of anaesthesia was justified as “it was inappropriate to use anaesthetics and sedatives which selectively block or enhance autonomic activity”.

It is also not known whether the dogs were euthanised after completion of the study. For ‘cost efficiency’ they might in fact be used again, but as Australia does not have retirement facilities for these animals, the only other option is to kill them.

Concerns shared by Humane Research Australia

The experimental process and care of the dogs was approved by The Animal Care and Ethics Committee of the University of Newcastle had approved the experimental process and care of these 12 greyhounds, but Humane Research Australia has a number of concerns about this study. They list some of these as:

  1. Why is there no mention of additional pain relief during the recovery period?
  1. How can such invasive surgery as this, including passing catheters through main veins and arteries into the heart, be approved when only local anaesthetic was used?
  1. How can the decision not to use general anaesthesia or sedatives be justified when the experiment involved the inflation and deflation of balloons that were specifically designed to cause a raise in blood pressure, and therefore distress?
  1. Was it really necessary to conduct this experiment given that a number of very similar experiments had been conducted in the past? (It would seem not as the results from this study did not differ from those of previous studies)

Experimentation on animals is unnecessary

The veterinarian Andre Menache [BSc(Hons) BVSc MRCVS] says:

‘T[his].. study is an example of curiosity-driven basic research, which is generally defined thus:

“Basic research is experimental or theoretical work undertaken primarily to acquire new knowledge of the underlying foundations of phenomena and observable facts, without any particular application or use in view”

The question society needs to ask itself is whether these types of research are at all necessary, considering the damage and distress caused to the dogs and any other animals involved in similar research. In fact, there are even discoveries underway that will bring about changes to this type of research where animal experimentation will be entirely replaced with technologies.
(read more: http://news.discovery.com/tech/biotechnology/technology-replace-testing-animals-130729.htm )

John J. Pippin [MD FACC] writes in a report entitled “Curiosity Killed the Dog” (referring to a different case of experimentation on dogs):

“By way of overview, this team’s research involves a single area of physiological expertise and a single animal preparation. It has successfully mined those attributes to carry out largely repetitive and unproductive animal studies, using their own and others’ previous findings to carry on with minor variations upon very few central themes. By doing so, they have published scientific articles for over 16 years, without apparent correlation with, or influence upon, similar areas of human physiology or medicine. This body of work amounts, in my view, to a startling example of the pursuit of disconnected scientific knowledge with no clear human benefits, and to the detriment of dogs.” – John J. Pippin

 

What can we do?

We can help Humane Research Australia in their quest to convince the necessary people to stop funding animal experiments.

Write to the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), asking them to stop funding animal experiments with your taxpayer dollars, and to instead fund research that is relevant to human health:

Prof. Warwick Anderson
Chief Executive Officer
NHMRC
GPO Box 1421
Canberra, ACT 2601
Email: nhmrc@nhmrc.gov.au

Lodge a complaint form at https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/about/contact-us/complaint-form

You can also write to the Animal Ethics Officer at the University of Newcastle to express your disappointment at their useless and unnecessary research projects experimenting on greyhounds:

Kim Hughes
Animal Ethics Officer
The University of Newcastle
Email: kim.hughes@newcastle.edu.au

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